Education Encouragement

By Jon Antonucci  Jon Antonucci / Image courtesy blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com

After being incarcerated for over four years now, I have arrived at the undeniable conclusion that obtaining an education while in prison is nothing short of difficult. Despite the perception of the public that inmates are being rehabilitated while in the system, the reality of the situation is that opportunities for rehabilitation – specifically in regards to higher learning are often quite difficult to come by. Those who do wish to improve themselves may find themselves fighting an uphill battle to gain any sort of accredited education. 

Granted there are plenty of “career colleges” who will gladly receive compensation for their unaccredited  courses. And while their programs may be reasonably affordable, and boast the successes of a “certification” or even a degree, most of the diplomas and certificates that one will earn are not worth the  paper they are  printed on.  Sadly, many so-called “Bible Colleges” are a part of this scam. Those who are looking to increase their knowledge should beware those educators who will delightedly accept one’s money, but who cannot verify their accreditation. (Also be careful to double check accreditors. as several accreditation groups have recently surfaced to “accredit” schools who will pay them enough money, but who are not able to be accredited through legitimate means.)

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The Quest For An Education

Jon Antonucci

After being incarcerated for over 2 years now, I have come to the undeniable conclusion that obtaining an education while in prison is hard! Despite the general public’s perception that prisoners are being rehabilitated while in the system, in reality, rehabilitation through higher learning is hard to come by. Granted, many prisons require their inmates to pass a “mandatory literacy” examination, and some even require the completion of a GED. But for the most part, the educational train stops there and all inmates must get off. Those who desire to improve themselves through higher learning find that they must fight an uphill battle to receive any sort of accredited education.  Image courtesy degreescape.com

For those who are willing to fight that uphill battle, here are a couple of tips to help you be effective in your quest for education.

1) Be aware of non-accredited schools. There are many “career colleges” and “correspondence learning schools” that are more than happy to take your money; and usually, for very little work, will award you an Associate’s degree, Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree, or even Ph.D. (depending upon how much you pay them). But, their diplomas aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on. Sadly, many “Bible colleges” are a part of this scam. Before investing your time or money into a school, check their accreditation. If they can’t produce legitimate accreditations, such as regional accreditation, then you may want to reconsider enrollment.

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